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intruder
(Above: An intruder in my midst.)

Last year was a bust for both hay and apples, due to a very early 80 degree day coupled with a late season deep frost. The hay didn’t grow quite tall enough, weeds took over and the apple blossoms did not even phone it in.  The garden won’t be safe to plant with starter plants yet, so we are growing vegetables and herbs indoors. The oregano is sprouting, but who is the intruder in the center cell? I swear I didn’t plant anything other than what was in the oregano seed packet.

We were musing today – wondering what it was like for our friends in the south. Not Florida – but Southern Hemisphere. They could be window gardening, too, albeit for things that they only wanted to keep indoors, as of course, winter is creeping up on them there.  The Rural News from New Zealand discusses “green manure” this time of year. What is green manure? Is it the result of feeding your cows and horses too many green smoothies?

Nope – it is rather planting things like mustard grass in the fall right before and after you harvest your main crop. The plants add nutrients to the soil, and as they die off over the winter and are even cut back, the leaves and foliage acts as a “green manure” that feeds the soil. Nifty? I use my dead lawn to feed the beautiful lawn I might have someday.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, May 7th, 2013 at 3:56 am and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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